ABOUT/CIRCULARITY

Daylight, night.

Full moon, new moon.

Spring, summer, autumn, winter.

Our mind is linear, but the world — our day, a month or a year exists in the pattern of cycles, as does our body.
Let’s get inspired by that!

We all are aware of a shared economy, where we can swap, rent or buy clothes at secondhand such as coats, shirts or jeans. But what about underwear? For hygienic reasons it is not possible to obtain it in that way. That’s why in Créeme we produce lingerie from 100% certified materials which already protect our environment during production, but that’s not enough. From the beginning we think about what will happen after the end of life of the product, therefore we design lingerie according to the concept of “cradle to cradle”.

Cradle to cradle concept

Cradle to Cradle is a concept aimed at reducing waste during production processes, but also eliminating waste after the products have been fully used by customers. Specifically important is the design of the products and that they can be safely recycled based on either the biological cycle or technical cycle and will again become a source for new products.

Why does it matter?

Less than 1% of the textiles used to produce clothing are recycled into new clothes, only 12% of used textiles are recycled for other purposes, such as insulation or mattress stuffing. By 2030 global apparel consumption is projected to rise by 63%, from 62 million tons today to 102 million tons — equivalent to more than 500 billion additional T-shirts. The clothing waste accumulated between today and 2025 will weigh as much as today’s world population.

Yep, design is the heart of circular economy.

Yes, that’s true, but we need to redesign the whole phases – from designing of products to business models and to inspire customers to be part of this change. So, what happens with a product whose life cycle is over? Will we be able to replace its components or will it be recycled or decomposed?

There are two cycles that need to be separated in the Cradle to Cradle concept (C2C). The first is a technical cycle, comprising of man-made materials from synthetic or inorganic materials, for example polyamide, Lycra, nylon or metals. The second is the biological cycle, with materials from natural renewable sources such as cotton, flax or hemp. It is not the aim to stop the production of synthetic materials, but it is important to clearly separate these two cycles so that materials from one group are not used together with those in the second group, which should ensure that the product can be recycled and do not end up as a waste.

Clothes made from a blend consisting of 95% cotton and 5% Lycra are so tightly joined in the fiber that it’s not possible to separate these fibers from one of another, which results in waste for landfills. Instead, the cycle can be closed and the C2C used clothing made into a new fiber — a new textile. Nowadays, there are technologies available that can recycle cotton and turn it into a new 100% cotton fiber. It consists of 30% recycled cotton from post-consumer waste and 70% GOTS certified cotton. Cotton is cut into small pieces and therefore, due to the fiber quality, it is not possible to use more post-consumer textile. According to the circular economy, re-using is the most sustainable way to avoid unneeded new extraction from our planet.

Well you know, there is no Planet B.

We have thoughtfully created recyclable underwear design. The bra is supposed to be comfortable and fit our body well. That’s why it will always be necessary to use textile, elastic bands, threads, labels, metal pieces, metal fastening or underwires. The smallest details are the most important part and we always go into depth. What fiber is used in the textile or elastic, or what kind of metals are found in the components. Therefore we do not buy them from the stock of any haberdashery, but everything is made-to-order. Only in this way can we be sure that they are made from one hundred percent materials, such as 100% cotton textiles, 100% cotton threads, 100% synthetic elastic bands and clean brass components. The individual parts of the bra are then only sewn together, so that they can be easily separated and recycled after use. Find out more about materials here.

We are in the first phase.

Let’s summarize it. A brand based on circular economy focuses on three phases – product design according to the Cradle to Cradle concept, brand recycling management, and ultimately inspiring customers to cooperate with us. In Créeme we are in the first phase. We design lingerie according to the concept of “cradle to cradle”, monitor how the individual materials are produced environmentally, and keep raising our awareness. Our aim is to enjoy the present moment with the lingerie on and in full health, and make the circular economy process work as simply as the regenerative process of nature.

We create our future with every act and with every kindness. Here and now.

We can only make a change together.

Sources:

  1. Braungart, Michael & McDonough, William. (2008) – Cradle to cradle, published by Vintage 2009, ISBN 9780099535478.
  2. The Ellen MacArthur Foundation. (2017) – “ A New Textiles Economy: Redesigning Fashion’s Future”. URL: https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/assets/downloads/publications/A-New-Textiles-Economy_Full-Report_Updated_1-12-17.pdf
  3. Global Fashion Agenda & Boston Consulting Group, Pulse of the Fashion Industry (2017), page 8. URL: https://globalfashionagenda.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Pulse-of-the-Fashion-Industry_2017.pdf
  4. Braungart, Michael & McDonough, William. (2008) – Cradle to cradle, published by Vintage 2009, ISBN 9780099535478.
  5. The Ellen MacArthur Foundation. (2017) – “ A New Textiles Economy: Redesigning Fashion’s Future”. URL: https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/assets/downloads/publications/A-New-Textiles-Economy_Full-Report_Updated_1-12-17.pdf